Legal document copying and archive services will free-up time and storage space

It’s a well-known fact that many law firms spend huge amounts of time and money on document copying – time and money that they often fail to recover in the fees charged for a case.  Using a professional legal copying service is an efficient way to save valuable staff time, whilst reducing the costs spent on expensive print consumables.

Legal Scanning - Pro-Doc.co.uk

Legal Document Scanning frees up space. Image by ‘shho’ at sxc.hu

Using a legal copying service also provides a way to accurately record the costs involved with copying legal documents, making it possible to fully recover the costs from clients, allowing your staff to utilise their expertise and concentrate on their roles.

For legal scanning Leeds based company www.pro-doc.co.uk are hard to beat. If you work for a legal company you’ll be all too aware that time is money so it’s essential to find a professional document management company that offers a fast turnaround on the copying of all legal documents, including the documentation that’s associated with conveyancing or court bundles.

Digital management of legal documents is normally provided in a PDF file format, with the additional option to include optical character recognition which will allow phrase and word searches throughout the whole bundle of documents or within each individual file.  Once your documents have been converted into a digital format, they can be returned to you in a wide range of different formats including DVD, CD, memory stick or an external drive.  Some document management companies also offer secure online storage facilities, designed to provide multiple user access as required.

It is also possible to have legal documents copied or printed as ‘hard copies’ and depending on your requirements, it should be feasible to have many thousands of documents printed per day, on a variety of different paper sizes and in various finishes.  Once printed or copied, documents can then be collated, stapled or punched so that they replicate exactly the original paperwork.

Electronic disclosure is a process which is used to capture, collate, restore and manipulate large quantities of the legal documentation that is required during the process of disclosure in civil litigation.  Electronic disclosure is designed to pinpoint the required documents from large volumes of unsorted documents in a thorough way and when combined with the digitisation of paper documents, should result in a comprehensive library of documents, designed to enable a full disclosure.

Legal copying and document management services are designed to reliable and effectively capture legal data – so rather than struggling to cope with mounds of paperwork, why not let a professional legal document management company take the strain?  Using legal copying services will not only free up your time and your staff’s valuable time, it also offers an effective way to accurately pass on the costs that be incurred through copying directly to your clients.

 

What is collaborative family law?

Collaborative family law is a legal process that was developed during the 1990s in response to the increasing numbers of acrimonious, lengthy divorce cases.  By putting the emphasis firmly onto constructive, face-to-face communication, collaborative divorce is now widely credited with helping couples reach positive, long-lasting resolution to their differences.

The collaborative process begins with each side appointing their own collaborative family lawyer.  After this has taken place, negotiations can begin but this is where the collaborative process differs from a ‘traditional’ court-based divorce.  Rather than conducting proceedings over the telephone or through letters; you, your ex-partner and your respective lawyers all meet face-to-face. What it isn’t is family mediation – go to www.familymediationcouncil.org.uk/ for more info on that. Otherwise, you should visit www.dovetaildivorce.com for their very good explaination of Collaborative Family Law.

Collaborative family lawyers are different from other family lawyers because they have been specially trained in the collaborative process.  Family lawyers are trained by an organisation called Resolution which is a specialist body representing family lawyers in England and Wales. Source: www.dovetaildivorce.com

dovetail-logoThe collaborative process begins with the signing of a ‘collaborative agreement.’  This is a legal document which is signed by all involved (including the family lawyers); the agreement disqualifies your family lawyer from representing you in court and should negotiations break down, the collaborative process is terminated immediately.  This also applies even if only one of you goes to court.

Collaborative face-to-face meetings are usually conducted in the offices of one of your family lawyers.  The number of meetings that is required varies from case to case and is entirely dependent on your individual circumstances.  It will be up to you and your partner to set the agenda and choose the topic of each meeting as this has been found to be the best way to give couples control over proceedings.

Collaborative meetings are designed to offer a safe, amicable and constructive forum for discussion and have proven to be extremely beneficial in helping couples to reach long-lasting, effective resolutions that feel fair for all involved.  By working together it is usually possible for couples to reach a common ground on even the most contentious issues, such as the care of the children, property and family finances.

Although collaborative meetings are normally only attended by the couple and their lawyers, many couples choose to have other professionals such as financial advisors or a divorce coach, present at their meetings. 

Once agreements have been reached, the collaborative process concludes when your respective lawyers put these agreements into effect.  If a Court Order is required, your lawyers will be able to do this too.

Research has shown that when couples opt for the collaborative approach to divorce, the solutions that they reach are generally far more likely to work than those which have been imposed by a judge.  Collaborative divorce has also proven to be highly successful helping couples to maintain a civil, constructive relationship with each other which is, of course, especially beneficial where any children may be concerned.

If you are facing the prospect of divorce and would like to find a route to divorce that protects not only your interests but the emotional wellbeing of your children, collaborative family law could work for you. 

Understanding the Collaborative Divorce Process

For many people, the prospect of divorce can seem too hard to bear.  Stressful courtroom appearances, demanding letters from solicitors, traumatic arguments – divorce really has earned itself an unenviable reputation.

However there are now two new routes to divorce which have been designed to be less confrontational and more amicable.  Collaborative divorce was developed during the 1990s in reaction to the increasing number of long, acrimonious divorce cases.  Created to help couples reach their own solutions to contentious issues, collaborative divorce is now widely recognised as being an effective route to divorce that can protect the whole family. As members of Resolutions http://www.resolution.org.uk network, Dovetail Divorce can help with all collaborative family law issues.

The idea behind the collaborative approach to divorce is simple: giving couples the time, space and support to reach their own agreements.  Many divorce lawyers have known for some time that when couples communicate directly with each other and are given the support and legal ‘back-up’ to find resolution to contentious issues, the likelihood is that they will reach outcomes that are amicable and feel fair to all those involved.

The collaborative approach to divorce is based around a series of collaborative ‘face-to-face’ meetings – the number of meetings that are required varies from case to case and simply depends upon the complexity of the financial, property and childcare arrangements for each couple.  Before the meetings can begin, both sides must sign a ‘participation agreement’ to confirm that they will adhere to the collaborative route and should either party seek resolution through the courts, the process will end with immediate effect.

Collaborative ‘face-to-face’ meetings are designed to provide a forum for calm, safe and practical discussion, allowing both sides to air their point of view.  When couples agree to use the collaborative view, they also agree to respect the opinion of their ex-partner and this helps to the meetings as constructive and civil as possible.  This amicable atmosphere often helps to speed the process up as decisions can be reached more easily, achieving successful outcomes for all.   If necessary, collaborative meetings can also be attended by independent financial advisors and/or divorce coaches.

Family mediation is also proving highly successful in helping to reduce the stress and negative outcomes of divorce.  A number of mediators now specialise in working with divorcing and separating couples and their expertise in helping couples to arrive at amicable, workable solutions is proving invaluable in many cases.  Family mediation, like collaborative divorce, is designed to encourage couples to reach practical, long-lasting solutions to their divorce, but is different from divorce because the end result is not necessarily the end of the marriage.  However, lawyer mediators are practising lawyers who are also trained as family mediators and they are able to help couples amicably work their way through divorce.

Collaborative divorce and mediation aren’t suitable in all cases, especially where there is a background of domestic violence or abuse.  Both routes to divorce are most suited to couples who agree that they want to find an amicable, constructive solution; for further information and advice why not contact your local family lawyer or mediation service?

Protecting your children from your divorce

If you are in the unhappy position of facing the end of your marriage, it’s likely that you’re extremely concerned about the effect that your divorce may have upon your children and your family relationships. Whilst children have long been recognised as often being those who suffer the most during a divorce, there are constructive steps that you can take to help minimise the negative impact of divorce on your family.

Talking to your children in the right way about your divorce can be hugely beneficial in helping them to feel safe, secure and loved by both of you.  The easiest way to do this is to maintain a civil, constructive relationship with your ex and whilst this may seem very difficult at the start, by opting for a more amicable route to divorce, such as mediation, you will be taking a positive step towards this.

Remember that your children have a right to love you both and if you both manage to maintain a good relationship with them during your divorce, this is the easiest way to protect this relationship. Talking together to your children is the best way to show your children that you are still their parents, not matter what has happened before.  Your children are likely to be extremely worried about whom they will live with, how often they will see you and how their lives or routine will change.  Try to give them the answers that they need as quickly as you can and whilst you’re working out the details, let your children know that it’s ok for them to ask questions and have an input.

It is very important that you reassure your children that they are not responsible for your marriage break up; let them know that they’ve not done anything wrong and that they can’t do anything to change what’s happened.  Children react very differently to the end of their parent’s divorce: some might be upset or angry, whilst some children appear to show no reaction at all.  If you are concerned about how your children are coping, a family mediator or family lawyer will be able to help you find professional help.

Adult arguments and fights only serve to make the process of divorce more stressful for your children and you.  Using an alternative approach to divorce, such as family mediation, is now widely recognised as being beneficial in helping couples to work through their differences in a way that is constructive and allows for faster resolution of contentious issues. 

Family mediation isn’t a form of counselling and isn’t designed to help couples get back together, however it will help you work collaboratively to decide how to end your relationship in as constructive a way as possible.  A specialist lawyer mediator – a practising legal expert, for example a barrister or lawyer who is also trained in mediation – can help your resolve any issues that need to be solved whilst working out what’s best for you and your family.

Collaborative Family Law – An Overview

For many people, the prospect of divorce can seem too hard to bear.  Stressful courtroom appearances, demanding letters from solicitors, traumatic arguments – divorce really has earned itself an unenviable reputation.

However there are now two new routes to divorce which have been designed to be less confrontational and more amicable.  Collaborative divorce was developed during the 1990s in reaction to the increasing number of long, acrimonious divorce cases.  Created to help couples reach their own solutions to contentious issues, collaborative divorce is now widely recognised as being an effective route to divorce that can protect the whole family.

The idea behind the collaborative approach to divorce is simple: giving couples the time, space and support to reach their own agreements.  Many divorce lawyers have known for some time that when couples communicate directly with each other and are given the support and legal ‘back-up’ to find resolution to contentious issues, the likelihood is that they will reach outcomes that are amicable and feel fair to all those involved.

The collaborative approach to divorce is based around a series of collaborative ‘face-to-face’ meetings – the number of meetings that are required varies from case to case and simply depends upon the complexity of the financial, property and childcare arrangements for each couple.  Before the meetings can begin, both sides must sign a ‘participation agreement’ to confirm that they will adhere to the collaborative route and should either party seek resolution through the courts, the process will end with immediate effect.

Collaborative ‘face-to-face’ meetings are designed to provide a forum for calm, safe and practical discussion, allowing both sides to air their point of view.  When couples agree to use the collaborative view, they also agree to respect the opinion of their ex-partner and this helps to the meetings as constructive and civil as possible.  This amicable atmosphere often helps to speed the process up as decisions can be reached more easily, achieving successful outcomes for all.   If necessary, collaborative meetings can also be attended by independent financial advisors and/or divorce coaches.

Family mediation is also proving highly successful in helping to reduce the stress and negative outcomes of divorce.  A number of mediators now specialise in working with divorcing and separating couples and their expertise in helping couples to arrive at amicable, workable solutions is proving invaluable in many cases.  Family mediation, like collaborative divorce, is designed to encourage couples to reach practical, long-lasting solutions to their divorce, but is different from divorce because the end result is not necessarily the end of the marriage.  However, lawyer mediators are practising lawyers who are also trained as family mediators and they are able to help couples amicably work their way through divorce.

Collaborative divorce and mediation aren’t suitable in all cases, especially where there is a background of domestic violence or abuse.  Both routes to divorce are most suited to couples who agree that they want to find an amicable, constructive solution; for further information and advice why not contact your local family lawyer or mediation service?

 

 

Finding an amicable route to divorce or separation

Whilst there will always be an element of pain when a family goes through divorce or separation, there are now several ways for couples to sort out the details of their split that do not involve stressful courtroom confrontations.  Unfortunately there is no such thing as an easy divorce but a specialist family lawyer or mediator could help you go through the process in a way that leads to an amicable outcome.

Separation and divorce are widely acknowledged as being extremely stressful and sadly an amicable solution outside the courts is not suitable for every couple.  However when couples can both commit to finding a civil resolution, there are several different routes to divorce that are now available.

Opting for a collaborative divorce or mediation will allow both you and your partner to work through your problems by talking them through, working towards amicable, constructive solutions that are suited to your needs and the needs of your children.  Collaborative family lawyers and lawyer mediators have been specially trained to offer support alongside legal advice and will help you to retain control of the speed and final outcome of your separation.

Lawyer mediators are trained family mediators with a working knowledge of divorce law and are practising divorce lawyers, barristers and legal executives.  Their working knowledge allows them to offer legal advice alongside mediation, ensuring that any agreements that are reached are legally binding and fair.

It is important to note that family mediation is entirely different from counselling: family mediators help couples to work out the details of their separation together and family mediation is not used as a way to help couples get back together.   During the mediation process, you and your ex-partner will work with your lawyer mediator to talk through contentious issues such as your children and the division of assets.  A lawyer mediator can help you work out what is best for your family with particular emphasis placed upon the needs and interests of your children.  Every family mediation case is different and the number of mediation meetings that you’ll require will depend entirely on your individual circumstances.

Couples who divorce or separate with the help of a lawyer mediator say that mediation helped them to part without increasing any hostility, guiding them towards positive, construction resolutions that felt fair for everyone involved.

Collaborative family law is a route to divorce that is conducted at a series of face-to-face meetings, rather than in the intimidating environment of a court room.  Collaborative family law has been designed to allow couples to talk through any issues that they need to solve; during the process you and your lawyer will regularly meet up with your ex-partner and their lawyer to work out the details of your separation.  Whilst your lawyers are there to offer legal advice and support, it is up to you and your ex to decide on the focus of each meeting, with the option to involve other professionals, such as financial advisers, as necessary.

To demonstrate absolute commitment to the collaborative process, the start of a collaborative divorce begins with both sides signing a ‘collaborative agreement.’  This is a legal document that will commit you to the collaborative process; should negotiations break down, your collaborative lawyer will be unable to represent you in court and the process will end with immediate effect.

Although divorce or separation will always have a huge impact upon families, there are now positive steps that can be taken to minimise any stress and lasting impact.  Family mediation and collaborative divorce are widely recognised as being beneficial in helping couples to find positive solutions to their differences – for further information, please contact your local family law practice.